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Cops: Woman Creates ‘Attack’ To Get Attention From ‘Boyfriend’

By William McGuinness
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File -- The south campus of The University of Colorado - Boulder. (credit: University of Colorado)

File — The south campus of The University of Colorado – Boulder. (credit: University of Colorado)

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BOULDER, Colo. (CBS Connecticut) – An East Lyme woman stands charged with filing a fake police report at the University of Colorado at Boulder because she allegedly wanted more attention from a former boyfriend.

Nina Fiorillo originally said a 200-pound, college-aged black man assaulted her, claiming he cut her arms and face with a straight blade while he pinned her against a wall.

In an interview, Fiorillo told police that she was at a friend’s apartment where a group of 15 were drinking casually and playing a Mario Kart video game on a Nintendo Wii before leaving for another house. She left alone, deciding not to join the group.

She told police that she escaped by landing a knee solidly into his groin, creating enough distance so she could run away to her room. There she broke down in a fit of sobs so debilitating that a girlfriend had to be called over to call the police for her.

A 43-page police report details the investigative actions of the Boulder police, which included a forensic investigation, interviews and a canvassing of local businesses for video evidence from security cameras. Boulder police even picked up a man matching Fiorillo’s imagined attack for questioning.

But when Fiorillo found the details harder to remember, police considered her story hard to believe.

No video cameras from multiple locations were able to visually confirm the attack, and she tried to create distance between herself and another man.

When confronted with those inconsistencies, she admitted that she might have made up elements of the story to garner attention from a student she liked but with whom she’s had a complex relationship.

She called him her boyfriend when police asked. Their relationship was a year old, she told investigators. The “boyfriend” told police they were simply “close friends.”

Fiorillo’s friend suggested via text message that the “boyfriend” stay with Fiorillo that night because she was terrified.

Fiorillo’s final story in the police report said she may have gotten the scratches when she fell into a thorny bush on the way home. The knife, she told investigators, was a leap made by her friend when she called police.

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