The martini has been in existence for well over a century, and it has persevered as one of America’s favorite cocktails. The gin-based drink can be prepared a number of ways, with varying degrees of dryness. For some of the best recipes, we called upon bartender John Ginnetti from the New Haven cocktail lounge 116 Crown.
John Ginnetti
116 Crown
116 Crown St.
New Haven, CT 06510
(203) 777-3116
www.116crown.com

John Ginnetti has been a bartender for 15 years and is the owner of 116 Crown, which opened in August 2007. The cocktails he prepares there have consistently won rave reviews from patrons and critics alike. He has also taught mixology at the University of New Haven. Here he shares some of his favorite martinis.

Montgomery

  • 4 oz Plymouth gin
  • 1/4 oz Boissiere dry vermouth
  • 4 to 6 ice cubes
  • 1 olive

Directions:

  1. Pour gin and vermouth in a cocktail shaker.
  2. Add ice and shake until chilled.
  3. Strain mixture in a chilled martini glass.
  4. Garnish with an olive.

Ginnetti says this was Humphrey Bogart’s recipe. It was named after the British general Bernard Montgomery whose army in World War II outnumbered his German opponents 15 to 1 (the same as the ratio of gin to vermouth in this martini).

1951

  • 4 oz Plymouth gin
  • 2/3 oz Boissiere dry vermouth
  • 1/3 oz Cointreau
  • 1-2 anchovy-stuffed olives
  • 4 to 6 ice cubes

Directions:

  1. Coat a chilled martini glass with Cointreau by swirling it around inside, then pour it out.
  2. Pour gin and vermouth in a cocktail shaker.
  3. Add ice and shake until chilled.
  4. Strain mixture in the Cointreau-coated martini glass.
  5. Garnish with one or two anchovy-stuffed olives.
The Vesper

  • 3 oz Martin Miller’s gin
  • 1 oz Russian Standard vodka
  • 1/2 oz white Lillet
  • orange
  • 4 to 6 ice cubes

Directions:

  1. Combine gin, vodka and Lillet in a cocktail shaker.
  2. Add ice and shake until chilled.
  3. Strain mixture in a chilled cocktail glass.
  4. Garnish with an orange twist.

This martini originated from a 1953 James Bond novel written by Ian Fleming. Says Ginnetti, “It was named for Vesper Lynd in ‘Casino Royale’ who remarked, ‘It sounds perfect and it’s very appropriate to the violet hour when my cocktail will now be drunk all over the world.'”

Related: Top Champagne Drinks From a Connecticut Mixologist

Martinez

  • 3 oz Hayman’s Old Tom Gin
  • 3/4 oz Boissiere sweet vermouth
  • 1 oz Luxardo maraschino liqueur
  • Peychaud’s Bitters
  • 4 to 6 ice cubes
  • orange or lemon

Directions:

  1. Combine all ingredients in a cocktail shaker.
  2. Add ice and shake until chilled.
  3. Strain mixture in a chilled cocktail glass.
  4. Garnish with an orange or lemon twist.

Ginnetti calls this “the forebear to the martini,” however it is much sweeter.

The Grace Tully

  • 3 oz Linie Aquavit
  • 1 1/2 oz Boissiere dry vermouth
  • lemon
  • 2 olives
  • 4 to 6 ice cubes

Directions:

  1. Rub a lemon twist around the rim of a chilled martini glass.
  2. Pour aquavit and vermouth in a cocktail shaker.
  3. Add ice and shake until chilled.
  4. Strain mixture in the lemon-rimmed cocktail glass.
  5. Garnish with the olives.

Grace Tully was President Franklin Roosevelt’s secretary. This martini variation named for her is the same as the “FDR” cocktail, except it uses aquavit in place of gin. Ginnetti explains, “Tully recounted in an interview that FDR was known to be a sloppy mixer and once mixed a martini with aquavit by mistake.”

Related: Most Creative Cocktails In Connecticut

Joshua Palmes is a freelance writer covering all things Connecticut. His work can be found on Examiner.com.
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