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#2 Alabama Has Won 13 Straight Against Tennessee, CBS' Brian Jones Doesn't See That Streak Breaking SaturdayThe Tide head to Knoxville to play the Volunteers this weekend, riding a long winning streak in the rivalry, one that Jones believes will continue.
Henry Munoz On 'Essential Heroes: A Momento Latino Event's Message: 'If We Are United Through This Moment, Our Country Will Be Better'Henry Munoz discusses 'Essential Heroes: A Momento Latino Event' coming to CBS on Monday, October 26th.
Alexandra Pelosi On Showtime Documentary 'American Selfie: One Nation Shoots Itself': 'Social Media Is Destroying Our Democracy'The daughter of Nancy Pelosi discusses her new Showtime documentary about a year in the life of America and what it was like to document everything from COVID-19 to protests over the death of George Floyd.
Alicia Keys To Host 'Every Vote Counts: A Celebration Of Democracy' On October 29thCBS announced today a new one-hour entertainment special, Every Vote Counts: A Celebration Of Democracy, to be broadcast Thursday, October 29th from 9:00-10:00 PM, ET/PT on CBS and available on demand on with CBS All Access. 
'The Amazing Race's Phil Keoghan On What To Expect As A Contestant: 'You Just Never Know What You're Going To Do'Phil Keoghan discusses the first two episodes of the 32nd season of 'The Amazing Race' on CBS.
Fall Premieres Announced For 'FBI,' 'FBI: Most Wanted,' 'Bull,' 'SEAL Team' And 'The Unicorn'CBS has announced the 2020-2021 Fall premiere dates for five more series.

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INTERVIEW: Safety steps to take when it comes to trick-or-treatingDr. Robert Kedder from Connecticut Children’s Medical Center talks about the safety steps to take if your children plan to trick-or-treat this Halloween.
Several towns have ballot questions for projects costing millions of dollarsEAST HARTFORD, CT (WFSB) – The polls open in less than 11 days from now and many people will decide the fate of some big projects. Twenty-eight towns across the state have ballot questions, some on projects costing millions of dollars. “We have lights that don’t work on the stage, there’s a tile on the flooring that is cracked and peeling,” said Maureen Brummet, Newington superintendent of schools. Most of Newington’s schools have undergone renovations in recent years, but Anna Reynolds Elementary School has been left behind. “This is a building that was built in the 50s, so it’s just at that time,” Brummet said. Newington voters will decide whether to move forward with a $35.5 million renovation project. The project will replace a leaking roof and uneven gym floor. Other changes include making the nurse’s office compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act. “Not a small number, but it doesn’t, it’s not going to get any smaller unfortunately,” Brummet said. Thanks to a reimbursement for the state, the town will need to fund $17.75 million of the $35.5 million project. Newington’s project isn’t the only renovation effort on the ballot. In Coventry, the Library Committee is seeking approval to borrow $750,000 to redo the Booth and Dimock Library. “We can move our elevator, which is now right in the middle of the library over to here, and that will allow people to access it directly from the entrance,” said Deb Walsh, Chairwoman of Booth and Dimock Library Improvement and Renovation Committee. The rest of the $1.7 million would come from grants and money left over from other library projects. One of the library’s problems also comes from a leaky roof. The original library was built in 1913, but the leaks are in the addition built in 1989. “The problem with, you know, the kinds of resources and materials we have in a library, is they are very, very susceptible to damage from damp of any kind,” Walsh said. The renovation would also create outside access to the library’s community room, allowing groups to use it after hours. Past efforts to upgrade the library, including an expansion, have failed to get enough support in town. East Hartford is also seeing $36.6 million for various projects around town. “East Hartford has always deferred maintenance on many of its town-owned buildings in an effort to differ any cost increases to the cost payers,” said Mayor Marcia Leclerc. Of the $36.6 million, $11.6 million would pay for new roofs at the middle and high schools. The town’s share for that would be $4 million. Another $15 million would cover road repairs over a two-year period. The final $10 million would go toward improvements to town hall and other town buildings. “I think what people forget is we’re not drawing the money down immediately, it’s putting planning in place,” Leclerc said. If voters approve the funding, Leclerc says the town would then prioritize its needs and start making upgrades. Some potential needs include the town hall’s electrical and heating and ventilation systems.
INTERVIEW: What to expect less than two weeks before Election DayFace the Nation moderator Margaret Brennan discusses what both campaigns are forcusing on in the final stretch.
Bright Spot: A look back at this week's Bright Spot featuresAfter a busy week, let's take a little break from the headlines and look back at this week's Bright Spots. This segment is sponsored by Connecticut Lighting Centers.
The Bright Spot: A week's worth of positivityWe're taking a look back at this week's 'Bright Spots.' This segment is sponsored by Connecticut Lighting Centers.
Family Friday: New England Food Truck Festival, Halloween Fun Days and moreHere's a look at some family fun activities happening this weekend. This segment is sponsored by By Carrier.
Greater Hartford area being called a "hot" market for real estateHARTFORD, CT (WFSB) -- The greater Hartford area is being called a "hot" market for real estate. The RE/MAX realty company surveyed 50 metropolitan areas in September. They found the Hartford area had a 33.3 percent increase in sales year-over-year, making it one of the three hottest markets in the country, joining San Francisco and Billings, Montana. Gov. Ned Lamont held a news conference on Friday morning to discuss the report, as well as the uptick in people relocating to Connecticut. To put it into perspective, a woman in Wethersfield said she’s had offers within the first two days of putting her house up for sale. “We thought well if we’re going to sell, we might as well try now,” said Tracy Schryver. She said she and her husband have been considering selling their home for about a year, and they finally made the move about a month ago. “Within the first two-and-a-half days, we had 42 showings and multiple offers. So, we are under contract,” Schryver said. Realtors suggest people should take advantage of this time. “Other buyers are coming in from surrounding states. We have a lot of New Yorkers coming in and that’s exciting,” said Annie Dillon of Keller Williams Realty. She said Connecticut’s location makes it a hot spot right now. There are also low interest and mortgage rates, which is taking more homes off the market and raising prices too. “When I saw the interest rates dipping into new territory, and hearing all the stories about how quickly homes were selling, I thought this might be a good time to sell this home,” said Claire Carney of Wethersfield, who is a buyer and a seller. Carney sold her home in less than three weeks, and said previously it took her up to four months. But buying was more of a challenge, with homes going under contract quickly. “Another house in the neighborhood came on the market. We quickly went in that day to see it. And we thought given today’s market, we better make an offer right then and there,” Carney said. Dillon suggests buyers get preapproved. Both homeowners and Dillon also suggest sellers consult a realtor. “They can line up painters, plumbers, electricians, everybody just to get your home prepped and ready to go on the market,” Dillon said. According to Zillow, greater Hartford homes are typically going under contract within eight days. Inventory is down 40 percent as compared to last year. Nationwide, closings climbed more than 20 percent from a year ago. RE/MAX expects the "buying boom" to continue into next year. The company credits the surge to the pandemic, saying lockdowns extended the peak summer buying season. Check out the full report from RE/MAX by <a href="https://news.remax.com/press-release/remax-national-housing-report-for-september-2020" target="_blank">clicking here</a>.
Wethersfield woman offers explanation after selfie sparks allegations of voter fraudWETHERSFIELD, CT (WFSB) -- A Wethersfield woman’s voting selfie is sparking concerns about voter fraud. Laura Ewell moved across town and got a second ballot. She took a picture of herself when she dropped off at town hall. Some Facebook users flagged it, saying it raised questions about the integrity of the voting system, but she said that’s not the case. “I think that it’s unfortunately very telling about the state of our nation today,” said Laura Ewell, of Wethersfield. When she cast her absentee ballot, she did what so many other voters have done, which is taking a selfie of the moment and sharing it on social media. However, this was her second ballot, after having moved during the election cycle, which made her first ballot invalid. So, Ewell joked about casting two ballots, but some Facebook users shared the post as a sign of a loophole that let Ewell vote twice. “It’s not a rare occurrence because people are moving all over the state right now,” said Sue Larsen, president of the Registrar of Voters Association of Connecticut. Local and state election officials say the system did exactly what it was supposed to do. Ewell requested an absentee ballot in August, but then in October, she moved across town to a different legislative district. “A couple of weeks later, I received a second ballot in the mail to my new address,” Ewell said. Ewell was surprised to get the ballot and called the town clerk, who informed Ewell her first ballot was invalid because she moved. Those safeguards are in place even if you move towns, as Connecticut uses a centralized system for voter registrations. Voter fraud also carries stiff penalties, up to five years in prison and a $5,000 fine in Connecticut. There are also potential federal crimes, as using absentee ballots could be considered mail fraud, and there are federal elections on the ballot. “These are serious penalties and not to be trifled with,” said Deputy Secretary of the State Scott Bates. Ewell did explain further down in her Facebook post what really happened, but she says if she could do it over again, she would have done more to make it clear nothing bad happened. “I probably would have done a better job in the top part of my post explaining the process,” Ewell said. She added that she called and if she had thrown away the second ballot, then she wouldn’t have her vote count at all. Election officials say you too should call your town hall if you have any questions about the election.
Coronavirus Updates: Positivity rate jumps to 2.9%, 8 more deaths reportedCoronavirus continues to impact the entire country, including Connecticut. Below is a breakdown of developments as they happen in the month of October: As of Friday, Gov. Ned Lamont said hospitalizations were at 233. Cases totaled 66,052. Deaths were at 4,577 since the start of the pandemic in Connecticut. For a complete town-by-town breakdown of the cases, click <a href="https://portal.ct.gov/-/media/Coronavirus/CTDPHCOVID19summary10232020.pdf" target="_blank">here</a>. Oct. 23 4 p.m. On Friday, there were 66,052 coronavirus cases reported, up 679 since Thursday. Out of 23,435 tests administered, 679 came back positive. That leaves a positivity rate of 2.9 percent. There were 8 new coronavirus-related deaths reported on Friday, bringing the total since the start of the pandemic at 4,577. Hospitalizations increased by 1, bringing the total to 233. The number of tests performed since the beginning of the pandemic is now at 2,113,068, an increase of 23,435 since Thursday. 12 p.m. During a news conference on Friday afternoon, Gov. Ned Lamont said today's numbers show the state is at a 2.9% infection rate. He went on to remind folks to continue taking precautions, saying "we're not out of the woods yet." Oct 22 4 p.m. On Thursday, there were 65,373 coronavirus cases reported, up 502 since Wednesday. Out of 22,117 tests administered, 502 came back positive. That leaves a positivity rate of 2.3 percent. There were 2 new coronavirus-related death reported on Thursday, bringing the total since the start of the pandemic at 4,569. Hospitalizations increased by 19, bringing the total to 232. The number of tests performed since the beginning of the pandemic is now at 2,089,633, an increase of 22,117 since Wednesday. Oct. 21 4 p.m. On Wednesday, there were 64,871 coronavirus cases reported, up 416 since Tuesday. Out of 15,846 tests administered, 416 came back positive. That leaves a positivity rate of 2.6 percent. There were 8 new coronavirus-related death reported on Wednesday, bringing the total since the start of the pandemic at 4,567. Hospitalizations decreased by 4, bringing the total to 213. The number of tests performed since the beginning of the pandemic is now at 2,067,516, an increase of 15,846 since Tuesday. Oct. 20 4 p.m. On Tuesday, there were 64,455 coronavirus cases reported, up 434 since Monday. Out of 14,653 tests administered, 434 came back positive. That leaves a positivity rate of 3 percent. There were 5 new coronavirus-related death reported on Tuesday, bringing the total since the start of the pandemic at 4,559. Hospitalizations increased by 22, bringing the total to 217. The number of tests performed since the beginning of the pandemic is now at 2,051,670, an increase of 14,653 since Monday. 2 p.m. During a news conference on Tuesday, Gov. Ned Lamont said the state is seeing the highest infection rate that it has had since June. He added that 22 more people have been hospitalized. Oct. 19 4 p.m. On Monday, there were 64,021 coronavirus cases reported, up 1,191 since Friday. Out of 71,905 tests administered, 1,191 came back positive. That leaves a positivity rate of 1.7 percent. There were 12 new coronavirus-related death reported on Monday, bringing the total since the start of the pandemic at 4,554. Hospitalizations increased by 11, bringing the total to 195. The number of tests performed since the beginning of the pandemic is now at 2,037,071, an increase of 71,905 since Friday. Oct. 16 On Friday, there were 62,830 coronavirus cases reported, up 802 since Thursday. Out of 33,048 tests administered, 802 came back positive. That leaves a positivity rate of 2.4 percent. There were 2 new coronavirus-related death reported on Friday, bringing the total since the start of the pandemic at 4,542. Hospitalizations decreased by 7, bringing the total to 184. The number of tests performed since the beginning of the pandemic is now at 1,965,112, an increase of 33,048 since Thursday. Oct. 15 On Thursday, there were 62,028 coronavirus cases reported, up 213 since Wednesday. Out of 15,817 tests administered, 213 came back positive. That leaves a positivity rate of 1.3 percent. There were 3 new coronavirus-related death reported on Thursday, bringing the total since the start of the pandemic at 4,540. Hospitalizations increased by 3, bringing the total to 191. The number of tests performed since the beginning of the pandemic is now at 1,932,064, an increase of 15,817 since Wednesday. Oct. 14 On Wednesday, there were 61,861 coronavirus cases reported, up 164 since Tuesday. Out of 8,359 tests administered, 164 came back positive. That leaves a positivity rate of 2 percent. There were 4 new coronavirus-related death reported on Wednesday, bringing the total since the start of the pandemic at 4,537. Hospitalizations increased by 16, bringing the total to 188. The number of tests performed since the beginning of the pandemic is now at 1,916,247, an increase of 8,359 since Tuesday. Oct. 13 On Tuesday, there were 61,697 coronavirus cases reported, up 320 since Monday. Out of 13,398 tests administered, 320 came back positive. That leaves a positivity rate of 2.4 percent. There was 1 new coronavirus-related death reported on Tuesday, bringing the total since the start of the pandemic at 4,533. Hospitalizations increased by 17, bringing the total to 172. The number of tests performed since the beginning of the pandemic is now at 1,907,888, an increase of 13,398 since Monday. Oct. 12 4 p.m. On Monday, there were 61,377 coronavirus cases reported, up 290 since Friday. Out of 77,261 tests administered, 1,066 came back positive. That leaves a positivity rate of 1.4 percent. There was 2 new coronavirus-related death reported on Monday, bringing the total since the start of the pandemic at 4,532. Hospitalizations increased by 21, bringing the total to 155. The number of tests performed since the beginning of the pandemic is now at 1,894,490, an increase of 77,261 since Friday. Oct. 9 4 p.m. On Friday, there were 60,038 coronavirus cases reported, up 290 since Thursday. Out of 17,257 tests administered, 290 came back positive. That leaves a positivity rate of 1.7 percent. There was 3 new coronavirus-related death reported on Friday, bringing the total since the start of the pandemic at 4,530. Hospitalizations increased by 6, bringing the total to 134. The number of tests performed since the beginning of the pandemic is now at 1,794,099, an increase of 17,257 since Thursday. Oct. 8 4 p.m. On Thursday, there were 59,748 coronavirus cases reported, up 384 since Wednesday. Out of 27,203 tests administered, 384 came back positive. That leaves a positivity rate of 1.4 percent. There was 5 new coronavirus-related death reported on Thursday, bringing the total since the start of the pandemic at 4,527. Hospitalizations decreased by 10, bringing the total to 128. The number of tests performed since the beginning of the pandemic is now at 1,776,842, an increase of 27,203 since Wednesday. Oct. 7 4 p.m. On Wednesday, there were 59,364 coronavirus cases reported, up 123 since Tuesday. Out of 7,617 tests administered, 123 came back positive. That leaves a positivity rate of 1.6 percent. There was 1 new coronavirus-related death reported on Wednesday, bringing the total since the start of the pandemic at 4,522. Hospitalizations increased by 9, bringing the total to 138. The number of tests performed since the beginning of the pandemic is now at 1,749,639, an increase of 7,617 since Tuesday. 9:50 a.m. Gov. Ned Lamont issued a correction to Oct. 6's data, which adjusted the state's positivity rate down to .07 percent. He said there was a data entry error and that the number of tests performed since Oct. 5 was actually 17,714, not the previously reported 8,200. Lamont said the data was corrected on the state's coronavirus website <a href="http://ct.gov/coronavirus" target="_blank">here</a>. Oct. 6 4:20 p.m. On Tuesday, there were 59,241 coronavirus cases reported, up 121 since Monday. That leaves a positivity rate of 1.5 percent. There were 4 new coronavirus-related deaths reported on Tuesday, bringing the total since the start of the pandemic at 4,521. Hospitalizations stayed the same, keeping the total at 129. The number of tests performed since the beginning of the pandemic is now at 1,742,022, an increase of 8,200 since Monday. Oct. 5 4 p.m. On Monday, there were 59,120 coronavirus cases reported, up 823 since Friday. That leaves a positivity rate of 1.64 percent. There were 4 new coronavirus-related deaths reported on Monday, bringing the total since the start of the pandemic at 4,517. Hospitalizations increased by 19, bringing the total to 129. The number of tests performed since the beginning of the pandemic is now at 1,724,308, an increase of 50,333 since Friday. Governor Ned Lamont said New London County represents half of the hospitalizations. Oct. 2 On Friday, there were 58,297 coronavirus cases reported, up 460 since Thursday. That leaves a positivity rate of 1.4 percent. There were two new coronavirus-related deaths reported on Friday, bringing the total since the start of the pandemic at 4,513. Hospitalizations increased by 3, bringing the total to 110. The number of tests performed since the beginning of the pandemic is now at 1,673,975, an increase of 33,808 since Thursday. Oct. 1 4:20 p.m. Gov. Lamont said 133 students and staff tested positive for COVID-19 last week. 4:15 p.m. On Thursday, there were 57,742 coronavirus cases reported, up 192 since Wednesday. That leaves a positivity rate of 1.8 percent. There were three new coronavirus-related deaths reported on Thursday, bringing the total since the start of the pandemic at 4,511. Hospitalizations increased by 3, bringing the total to 107. The number of tests performed since the beginning of the pandemic is now at 1,601,944, an increase of 10,372 since Wednesday. Sept. 30 4 p.m. On Wednesday, there were 57,550 coronavirus cases reported, up 221 since Tuesday. That leaves a positivity rate of 1.8 percent. There were three new coronavirus-related death reported on Wednesday, bringing the total since the start of the pandemic at 4,508. Hospitalizations increased by 12, bringing the total to 104. The number of tests performed since the beginning of the pandemic is now at 1,591,572, an increase of 12,390 since Tuesday. For a breakdown of coronavirus cases in September, click <a href="https://www.wfsb.com/news/coronavirus-in-ct-hospitalizations-jump-over-100-positivity-rate-reaches-1-8/article_2ee0e4fc-f2ee-11ea-beee-4bb138725890.html" target="_blank">here</a>. For earlier developments, click <a href="https://www.wfsb.com/news/the-latest-wednesdays-stats-show-no-new-covid-deaths-positivity-rate-rises-to-1-5/article_54edec52-67ad-11ea-8482-877cb5d00dcd.html" target="_blank">here</a>.
Report: Deadly use of force in Manchester officer-involved shooting was justifiedMANCHESTER, CT (WFSB) -- A report from the state’s attorney says deadly use of force during an officer-involved shooting in Manchester earlier this year was justified. The shooting happened in early April when the Department of Corrections Parole Fugitive Unit was attempting to issue a warrant for a suspect at a home on Oak Street. <a href="https://www.wfsb.com/news/man-killed-during-officer-involved-shooting-in-manchester/article_43274198-7550-11ea-805c-e7bcec3a9e80.html" target="_blank">RELATED: Man killed during officer-involved shooting in Manchester</a> When the officers came in contact with the suspect, later identified as Jose Soto, police said he made reference to a shooting if anyone came near him. Soto then barricaded himself inside the basement of the home. At that time, the CREST Team (Capital Region Emergency Services Team) was called in for assistance due to the threat of a possible firearm. After negotiating with Soto, police were able to convince him to come out of the house. The report says Soto “aggressively exit the house,” and was “’punching’ his hands up together in a firing position, while holding a black object, as if he was shooting a handgun.” That’s when multiple CREST members thought they were being fired upon, and several members fired their weapons. Several rounds struck Soto, who was taken to the hospital where he died. The State’s Attorney’s report said the use of force by the officers involved was “necessary to defend themselves, fellow officers and civilians in the immediate area from the imminent use of deadly physical force from Mr. Soto.” No further action will be taken.