Family & Pets

Top Corn Mazes In Connecticut

October 11, 2013 8:00 AM

View Comments
(Photo by Joe Raedle/Newsmakers)

(Photo by Joe Raedle/Newsmakers)

When Rodgers and Hammerstein wrote the lyrics that included “The corn is as high as an elephant’s eye…,” they knew what they were talking about. Cornfields grow very high and walking through them can be quite an experience. With corn stalks growing higher than most people, it’s quite a lot of fun during the autumn season to work your way through cornfield mazes, which farmers have strategically designed. Be careful, you never know what is skulking about in these mazes. However, do know that in addition to mazes, there’s also a lot more going on this time of year at all these venues. Pumpkin patches, apple picking, hayrides and cider tasting make for fun fall days.Related: Top Spots In Connecticut To Take Family Photos

Preston Farms
92 Route 2
Preston, CT 06365
(860) 886-6293
www.prestonfarmscornmaze.com

Celebrating its 14th Annual Cornfield Maze, Preston Farms has this great autumnal sport down pat. This year it’s all about “Gettsyburg.” This means that as you get lost among the sky-high cornstalks, you just might find yourself tracing the steps of Abraham Lincoln’s profile or the outline of a cannon. The farm is calling this the “maze makers revenge.” Covering two or three miles of maze, thrill seekers are advised to not think there’s an easy way out. There isn’t. Preston Farms not only has daytime maze trails, but flashlight times as well. Pack your own flashlight.

Foster Family Farm
90 Foster St.
South Windsor, CT 06074
(860) 648-9366
www.fosterfarm.com

When it comes to family adventure, Foster Family Farm has plenty of events. However, one of the main attractions throughout the month of October has to be its corn mazes. This farm features two mazes and they are expansive. Considering that they are four miles of well-designed paths and trails located on eight acres, there’s plenty of excitement walking under tall crops of corn. At night, it’s even more fun when flashlight mazes are spooky enough to make the corn maze adventure even more exciting. Pack your own flashlight and do get lost in the fun.

Lyman Orchards
32 Reeds Gap Road
Middlefield, CT 06455
(860) 349-1793
www.lymanorchards.com

If ever there was a corn maze designed to attract the most patriotic, fun-loving people, it’s this year’s Lyman Orchards corn maze. Specially designed to resemble the Statue of Liberty, Lady Liberty never had so many people lost in her midst. Here are two miles of challenging paths that will make a walk to freedom ever so sweet and certainly a lot of fun. Be aware that this year’s crop of corn is very tall. There’s lots to do here and plenty of apples to chomp on as you weave your way through the crown-topped maze.

Related: Top Spots To Entertain Grandparents On A Budget In Connecticut

Hayes Dairy
151 East St.
North Granby, CT 06060
(860) 653-4157
www.hayesmaze.com

Hayes Corn Maze has five paper punch stations throughout its extensively designed maze. The problem is that the locations are hidden, so adventurers will have to look high and low for them. Mazers will also have to answer some questions. If you get the answer wrong, there’s no telling how long it will take you to find your way out. Because Hayes Corn Maze also has flashlight maze nights, people need to make sure they are at their sharpest.

R-Farm
353 Tobacco St.
Lebanon, CT 06249
(860) 303-2367
www.r-farmct.com

There’s no elaborate design to this corn maze spread out over two and a half acres. One thing is for sure, no one gets lost in this kid-friendly corn maze. The kids come with their parents and enjoy a special experience. Having done his research, Risley decided he didn’t want a corn maze so elaborate that people could really get lost. “I didn’t want to have to send in a helicopter for anyone,” he said. However, he does have 15 mailboxes located in those mazes with activity cards in each one. Therefore brush up on your math and your super heroes, too.

Joanne Greco Rochman is the arts editor of The Fairfield County Review, a columnist, critic, feature story writer and English professor. Her work has appeared in The New York Times, The Republican-American and Hersam-Acorn Publications. Her work can be found at Examiner.com.

View Comments
blog comments powered by Disqus
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 845 other followers