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Travel

6 Bars In The Middle Of The Ocean

January 31, 2014 12:17 PM

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crop down103 6 Bars In The Middle Of The Ocean Credit: The Rock Restaurant

This article is from Thrillist Nation

Having a beer or 12 and passing out in a kiddie pool squeezed onto your fire escape doesn’t have quite the same appeal as sipping an umbrella cocktail in a coconut at one of these awesomely rickety, remote, water-locked watering holes.

crop down104 6 Bars In The Middle Of The Ocean Credit: The Rock Restaurant

The Rock Restaurant – Indian Ocean
Zanzibar, Tanzania

Situated on a rock that was once a fisherman’s post, The Rock Restaurant’s specialty seafood’s so fresh it might as well’ve flopped onto your plate — and even better when paired with any one of their many local brews.
How to get there: Wade; it isn’t far off the coast of Michanwi Pingwe beach. Alternatively, use its dedicated boat service.

crop down105 6 Bars In The Middle Of The Ocean Credit: Flickr user rod waddington

It’s easier to get to, albeit more imposing than idyllic, at low tide. The resto’s 12 tables each have panoramic ocean views.

crop down106 6 Bars In The Middle Of The Ocean Credit: Flickr user Dubdem sound system

Floyd’s Pelican BarParottee Bay
Negril, Jamaica

Ask for Floyd, the genius fisherman behind this spot, and then knock back some local Blackwell rum with him. Another drink on your list should be the Pelican Perfection, which is made with lime juice, rum, and ginger beer.
How to get there: Ask a local fisherman for a ride and be prepared to spend around 15min on a boat. We hope you’re good at holding your liquor.

crop down107 6 Bars In The Middle Of The Ocean Credit: Flickr user Alfred Moya

Looks precariously driftwood-ish.

crop down108 6 Bars In The Middle Of The Ocean Credit: The Honorable William Wall

Honorable William Wall BarNew York Harbor
New York City

The Manhattan Sailing Club’s floating clubhouse’s outfitted with a full bar on its scenic upper deck, from which you can see lower Manhattan and Ellis Island. BYO food is encouraged, though they serve snacks. Don’t miss their Full Moon parties.
How to get there: From May through October, a shuttle departs from North Cove Dock F every 30min from 5:30pm. Members ride free; the proletariat must pay $18 round-trip.

crop down109 6 Bars In The Middle Of The Ocean Credit: The Honorable William Wall

The Honorable William Wall’s sunset glamour shot.

crop down110 6 Bars In The Middle Of The Ocean Credit: watts with the wanderlust

Tsunami Island — Konkan Coast
Malvan, India

This is as back to basics as you can get with bar service at these little stick snack huts on Tsunami Island – a small island created by the last deadly wave in the area (hence the name). The island, which sits on the delta of the Tarkarli River, is best known for its stretch of pristine beaches and diving opportunities.
How to get there: Paddle on by — the 20,000sqft island is about five miles from Malvan, but close to the shore — and famous for serving snacks and breakfast boat-side.

crop down111 6 Bars In The Middle Of The Ocean Credit: Villa Escudero

Villa Escudero Waterfalls RestaurantLaguna De Bay
San Pablo City, Philippines

Stay cool while lunching on local grub and knocking back San Miguels with your feet in the water.
How to get there: Just roll up your shorts and wade on in. This massive complex also offers lodging, river tours, and a karaoke hall (because, well, the Philippines). 

crop down112 6 Bars In The Middle Of The Ocean Credit: Flickr user Tom Trelvik

The William Thornton Floating Bar & Restaurant The Bight Bay
Norman Island, British Virgin Islands

The Willy-T, a 100ft schooner, is as Spring Break-y as it gets in the BVIs — try your face at their shotski (an old water ski), or enjoy pub grub like conch fritters and steaks.
How to get there: Anchored off Norman Island, you can get to the Willy-T by boat, or by swimming (if you’re really motivated and not at all inebriated).

Sophie-Claire Hoeller is Thrillist’s über-efficient German associate travel editor. She grew up adhering to the old adage that one shouldn’t swim after eating. But no one ever mentioned drinking, so that’s what she’ll just keep doing. Follow her adventures on Twitter at @Sohostyle.

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