Traffic advisory: Route 6 is closed in Farmington,   at the foot of the mountain, between New Britain Avenue and Hyde Road, Read More

Greenest Companies To Work For In Connecticut

View Comments
Photo Credit Thinkstock

Photo Credit Thinkstock

Green is good and many companies and institutions in Connecticut are now realizing that. Going green can save money as well as the environment, and can promote a sense of camaraderie among employees. Here are just three of the greenest companies to work for in Connecticut.
 
Russo Lawn and Landscape, Inc.
russolawn.com
 
The 80-plus employees of Russo Lawn and Landscape in Windsor Locks not only work for a green company, they do “green” work – and in more ways than one.
 
Russo Lawn and Landscape is one of the largest of its type of companies in the state, yet like most of its smaller competitors and compatriots is also family owned. While other commercial landscapers and lawn care companies rely on noisy, fume-emitting gasoline-powered machines, however, Russo uses propane-fueled mowers. The fuel burns cleaner, reduces greenhouse emissions and saves the company and its clients money. It is also part of the “social responsibility” theme of this firm, which in addition to traditional services also offers green garden, lawn and yard design. That means developing ecologically and environmentally sustainable systems which need less water, use fewer (if any) chemicals and which use natural and often recycled products.
 
Choate Rosemary Hall
choate.edu
 
A storied prep school steeped in over 120 years of tradition, Choate Rosemary Hall (or just “Choate” for short) is a leader in going green. The Kohler Environmental Center at Choate is a model for green education – from its very design which incorporates a solar chimney and underground ducts that draw heat from the soil to its reliance on solar panels for electricity. At Choate, however, being green goes beyond just its signature building – the new “strategic plan” is all about making the entire campus a sustainable environment.
 
That means using waste cooking oil for energy, collecting rainwater in cisterns to irrigate the grounds and greenhouses, promoting organic landscaping and gardening and composting all food waste from the dining halls. Those halls, by the way, have also gone “tray-less,” which has helped reduce the amount of hot water and detergents needed for clean up. Choate has also turned to local farmers and artisans for much of its food requirements, and promotes a number of conservation and recycling programs – including the Hydro-Cup challenge, where dorms compete to see which can reduce water consumption the most over a three-week period.
 
Choate has also begun replacing old windows and lights with more energy-saving systems, and is switching over to low-flow bathroom fixtures. Green technologies are being introduced into old buildings, and students, faculty and staff are encouraged and rewarded for being green.
 
Aegis Solar Energy
aegis-solar.com
 
What can be greener than installing solar energy systems? That is what employees of Aegis say with pride. One of the first solar energy companies in Connecticut, Aegis has been in business for over 25 years, putting solar panels on roofs, building solar networks to heat pools, providing hot water and hot water heat for homes and businesses and public buildings and meeting other energy needs for private, commercial and government clients.
 
Aegis has been recognized for its green contribution by the Connecticut Clean Energy Fund and other public and private organizations.

You May Also Be Interested In These Stories

Mark G. McLaughlin is a professional and prolific writer with a proven publishing record in a wide variety of fields. An historian, novelist, freelance journalist, ghost-writer, book reviewer, magazine editor, web and magazine columnist, Mark has more than 30 years of experience. His work can be found at Examiner.com.


View Comments
blog comments powered by Disqus
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 857 other followers